How To Treat Foreign Object In Eye?

If a foreign object such as a speck of dust or grit enters your child’s eye, it will water and your child will not want to open it. If you can see something moving loosely over the white part, you can try to remove it. If, however, the foreign object is embedded in the eyeball or is on the coloured part of the eye (the iris), don’t touch it.

Possible Symptoms

  • Watery eye
  • Reluctance to open the eye
  • Pain and irritation
  • A visible embedded object

Is it serious?

Small specks of dust or grit in the eye are not serious since they are washed out naturally by the tears. But if your child’s eyeball is scratched, if an object has pierced  it, or if there is any kind of cut on the eyeball or eyelid, this is serious. If there is an object in the eyeball, do not try to take it out yourself. Take your child to your nearest hospital emergency department for treatment. 

What should I do first?

Look closely to see whether the foreign object is moving or embedded in the eye. Encourage your child to blink a few times—this may dislodge it, as may tears if he has been crying because of the pain and irritation. If the foreign object is embedded in the eye Do not attempt first aid treatment yourself. Keep your child’s eye closed by putting a pad over the eyelid and taping it securely in place. Go straight to the nearest hospital emergency department for treatment.

If the foreign object is not embedded in the eye

  1. Ask your child to look upward. Pull down the eyelid to see if the object is there. If it is, remove it with the corner of a clean handkerchief.
  2. Expose the area beneath the top lid by holding the eyelashes and pulling them back. Remove the object with the corner of a handkerchief. If your child won’t cooperate, you will need someone to help you. Seek medical assistance if necessary.
  3. If these methods don’t work, try to flush the foreign object out by gently pouring a glass of clean water across the open eye.

Should I seek medical help?

Go at once to the nearest emergency department if the eyeball is scratched, or if a foreign object has pierced the eye. Seek medical advice immediately if you cannot easily remove a floating foreign object from your child’s eye.

What might the doctor do?

  • The hospital doctor will remove the embedded foreign object from your child’s eye after putting drops of a local anaesthetic into the eye.
  • If the eyeball is scratched, the doctor will prescribe antibiotic drops to guard against infection and may bandage the eye to keep it closed for about 24 hours.

What can I do to help?

  • After the removal of the foreign object, the pain should ease in an hour or so. If it doesn’t, seek advice as soon as possible.

How To Treat Foreign Object In Ear?

The most common foreign objects that get stuck in a child’s ear are small items, such as beads, pushed in by the child or by a playmate. Very rarely, a small insect may fly into the ear and be trapped there.

Possible Symptoms

  • Pain and tenderness in the ear
  • A visible embedded object

Is it serious?

Any foreign object in the ear that cannot be removed easily should be regarded as serious because it may cause an infection of the external ear canal, otitis externa, or damage the eardrum.

What should I do first?

  1. If the object is small and soft, try to remove it with tweezers. If you can’t grasp it easily, leave it and seek medical advice as soon as possible.
  2. If the foreign object is an insect, lay your child on her side or tilt her head to one side with the affected ear uppermost, and pour warm water into the ear. The insect should float out.

Should I get medical help?

Follow medical guidance as soon as possible if the object cannot be removed, or if your child complains of pain and tenderness in the ear.

What might the doctor do?

After examining your child’s external ear canal, your doctor will remove the object and will treat any damage to the skin, or any infection that may have been caused by the foreign object.

What can I do to help?

Don’t let a child under three play with small objects that she could poke into her ear— or into her nose or mouth.

How To Treat Earache?

There are a number of causes of an earache. The most common is otitis media—an infection of the middle ear. Children under six are more prone to this infection, because the tube that runs from the throat to the ear—the Eustachian tube—is straight instead of slanted, and so infections of the nose and throat can easily spread to their middle ear cavity. A child may complain of an earache if he is suffering from a toothache or tonsillitis, if the glands in his neck are swollen, or if he has been out in the cold without a hat. An earache with intense pain may result from otitis externa—an infection of the outer ear—if, for example, a foreign object has been poked into the ear or if a boil has developed.

Possible Symptoms

  • Pain in the area around the ear
  • A temperature of over 98.6° F (37° C)
  • Discharge of pus from the ear
  • Deafness
  • Inflammation of the tonsils
  • Pain when the ear is touched
  • Swollen glands
  • Rubbing of the ear in a young child

Is it serious?

An earache with loss of hearing is serious.

What should I do first?

  1. Take your child’s temperature to see if he has a fever.
  2. Check if there is any discharge from the ear, and whether your child’s hearing is diminished. To do this, call his name quietly when his head is averted. See if he turns around.
  3. Examine the back of your child’s throat to see if the tonsils are abnormally enlarged or red.
  4. Check if your child has any inflammation in the outer ear cavity. Don’t put a cotton swab into the ear or use eardrops unless your doctor advises it.

Should I seek medical help?

Seek medical advice if your child complains of an earache, since most earache is caused by an infection. Consult a doctor immediately if your child is in pain, has a high fever, or if you notice any discharge from his ear. Consult a doctor as soon as possible if he is too young to tell you, and is crying, and pulling or rubbing his ear.

What might the doctor do?

Your doctor will examine your child to determine the cause of the earache. If necessary, he will recommend antibiotics.

What can I do to help?

  • Place a warm hot-water bottle, covered by a towel, next to your child’s ear, and give him child acetaminophen or ibuprofen to relieve the pain.
  • Make it sure to avoid water from entering your child’s ear while bathing him.

How To Treat Conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the membrane covering the eyeball and the inside of the eyelid which is called the conjunctiva. The inflammation may be caused by a viral or bacterial infection, or by injury from a foreign object or chemicals, or it may be the result of an allergic reaction. The eyes become red and weepy, and they can be painful, very itchy, and irritated by bright light. The condition, which may affect one or both eyes, is contagious, and can also be a symptom of hay fever.

Possible Symptoms

  • Weepy, red eyes that feel sore or itchy
  • Intolerance of bright light
  • Releasing of pus causing eyelashes to stick together after a night’s sleep

Is it serious?

Conjunctivitis is not serious, but it should always be treated by a doctor.

What should I do first?

  1. Look to see if there is a foreign object in the eye; if possible remove it.
  2. Bathe each eye with cooled, but boiled water. Use a new cotton ball for each eye, soak it in the water, and then wipe outward, start from the inner corner of the eye.
  3. If only one eye is affected, you can use an eye pad to prevent rubbing and further friction between the conjunctiva and other parts of the eye. Make sure that the eye pad itself does not aggravate the infection. Use a gauze pad held in place by a bandage.
  4. To prevent the spread of infection, encourage your child to keep his hands clean and not to rub his eyes.

Should I seek medical help?

Seek medical advice if you suspect conjunctivitis.

What might the doctor do?

  • If the condition is caused by an infection, your child may be given antibiotic eye drops or ointment to clear it. If the infection does not respond to treatment within a few days, your child may be referred to an eye specialist.
  • If the irritation is caused by an allergy, such as hay fever, your doctor will prescribe anti-inflammatory eye drops and antihistamine medication.
  • If there is a foreign object in your child’s eye, your doctor will remove it.

What can I do to help?

  • Make your child understand that to prevent the infection from spreading, he should always keep his hands clean; he should also use a separate washcloth and towel.
  • If your child suffers from hay fever, keep him away from freshly mown lawns during the worst hay fever months.

How To Treat Common Cold?

The common cold is caused by a virus that enters the body through the nasal channel and throat, and causes inflammation of the mucous membranes lining these passages. The body’s defence mechanism takes around 10 days to fight off the virus.

Possible Symptoms

  • Sneezing
  • Runny or blocked nose
  • Raised temperature
  • Coughing
  • Sore throat
  • Aching muscles
  • Irritability
  • Rhinitis

Is it serious?

A common cold is not serious. However, because it lowers the body’s resistance, complications such as bronchitis can sometimes arise. A cold should be regarded more seriously in a baby because minor symptoms, such as a blocked nose, can cause feeding problems.

What should I do first?

  1. Take your child’s temperature. If it is high (98.6° F (37° C) or more), put her to bed and bring her temperature down.
  2. Yellow discharge can indicate a secondary infection, while clear mucus could signify hay fever, so check your child’s nasal discharge.
  3. Don’t give any store-bought medicines without your doctor’s advice.

Should I seek medical help?

Consult your doctor immediately if you think your child has developed a secondary infection. If your baby is having trouble sleeping or feeding, consult your doctor immediately.

What might the doctor do?

  • Your doctor will treat a secondary infection to the cold.
  • Nose drops may be prescribed to make feeding easier. Use as directed, since overuse can damage the nose lining.

What can I do to help?

  • Ease your baby’s breathing by placing a pillow under the mattress to raise her head.
  • Give your child plenty to drink and teach her to blow her nose by blowing one nostril at a time.
  • If possible, create a humid atmosphere in your child’s bedroom.
  • Mark Vaseline on to your child’s nose and upper lip if they are sore.
  • Fresh lemon juice and water will soothe her sore throat, and clear her nasal passages.

How To Treat Otitis Externa?

Otitis externa is an infection of the external ear canal—the passage that leads from the ear flap (pinna) to the eardrum. The infection may be caused by a foreign object in the ear, by a boil in the canal, or as the result of damage to the skin from vigorous cleaning or scratching. The infection is more common in children who swim a great deal.

Possible Symptoms

  • Earache
  • Inflammation and soreness of the ear flap and external ear canal
  • Pus-filled boil in the canal
  • Discharge from the ear
  • Itchy, dry, scaly ear

Is it serious?

Since the external ear canal does not contain the ear’s delicate hearing mechanisms, the infection itself is relatively minor. However, it will always be treated seriously, because in rare cases the infection could spread to the skull bones, and possibly to the brain. Any discharge from the ear should be treated promptly since this could be a symptom of a serious middle ear infection.

What should I do first?

  1. Look into the ear canal to check for signs of infection or foreign objects. Remove objects only if you can do so easily. Don’t push or poke anything into your child’s ear, and discourage him from touching or scratching it.
  2. Ask your child to open his mouth wide to see if this causes pain.
  3. Gently pull back on the ear flap to see if this causes pain. Clean away any discharge using slightly warm water.
  4. Give your baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen to relieve pain, and place a cotton pad over the ear to absorb any discharge.

Should I seek medical help?

Seek medical advice if you notice any discharge from your child’s ear, or if you suspect infection.

What might the doctor do?

  1. Your doctor will examine your child’s ear with an instrument called an otoscope, and may clean out the ear with a probe. Antibiotic eardrops may be prescribed to clear up the infection.
  2. If there is a foreign object in your child’s ear, your doctor will remove it, or refer him to a hospital for its removal.
  3. If the pain is the result of a boil, your doctor may lance the boil and drain the pus.

What can I do to help?

  • If your child is in pain, give him baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen.
  • Avoid water from entering the ear until the infection has cleared up completely.
  • Never poke cotton swabs into your child’s ear to remove wax. They will only push it farther into the canal or damage the lining.
  • Never use eardrops unless your doctor advises them.

Children suffer HOW TO TREAT MOUTH ULCERS?

Children suffer HOW TO TREAT MOUTH ULCERS?

from a variety of mouth ulcers, all of them painful, although most are relatively harmless. Aphthous ulcers are usually small and creamy-white, and may be so painful that your child will be reluctant to eat. They are sometimes associated with stress, and may come in clusters during a particularly anxious time, such as starting school. A traumatic ulcer is larger, and usually starts as a sore patch on the inside of the cheeks, possibly after injury by biting or by the rubbing of a rough tooth. It enlarges to form a painful yellow crater. It heals very slowly and, regardless of treatment, takes 10–14 days to clear up completely. White, painful blisters on the roof of the mouth, on the gums, and inside the cheeks can be the result of a primary infection caused by the cold sore virus.

 

Possible Symptoms

  • Slightly whitish and sore raised areas anywhere on lining of the mouth, tongue, or gums.
  • Large red and yellowish area inside the cheeks
  • White blister like spots inside the mouth, which can sometimes be accompanied by a fever
  • Loss of appetite because eating becomes too painful

 

Are they serious?

Mouth ulcers are not serious, but because they can be painful they sometimes cause loss of appetite and interfere with your child’s eating.

 

What should I do first?

  1. If your child complains of a sore mouth or tongue, check to see if there are any areas of soreness.
  2. If the ulcer is large and is inside the cheek, check for a jagged tooth that might be rubbing the cheek lining.
  3. If the ulcers resemble white curds, try to wipe them off with a clean handkerchief. If this leaves red, raw patches, the ulcers could be caused by oral thrush (yeast).
  4. Give your child some liquid acetaminophen or ibuprofen to relieve the pain. Puree food to minimize chewing when ulcers are most painful.
  5. If your bottle-fed baby has a traumatic ulcer on the roof of her mouth, check the nipple. It may be too hard for your baby’s tender mouth.

 

Should I seek medical help?

Seek medical advice if the ulcers are very painful, or your home treatment doesn’t help. See your doctor if they are recurrent. If the ulceration is caused by a jagged tooth, take your child to the dentist.

 

What might the doctor do?

  • Your doctor will probably prescribe an anti-inflammatory cream for aphthous ulcers. The cream is not dissolved by saliva, and therefore clings to the ulcers and speeds healing.
  • If your child suffers from recurrent mouth ulcers, your doctor will give her blood tests to see if there is an underlying cause.

How To Treat Foreign Object In Nose?

If there is a foreign object of any kind in your child’s nose it is most likely to have been pushed in there by your child or a playmate. The problem may not even be noticed by you or your child at first, but after two or three days there will probably be a nosebleed, or perhaps even a blood-stained, foul-smelling discharge from the affected nostril.

 

Is it serious?

If the foreign object cannot be easily removed from your child’s nose, on no account attempt to remove it yourself—you might push it farther in. Instead, you should take your child to your nearest hospital emergency department. If the foreign object can be easily removed it is not serious and should have no after effects. It is more serious if your child inhales the object into her lungs, as this may partially block her air passages and result in breathing difficulties or choking.

 

What should I do first?

  1. If your child is old enough to understand, ask her to hold a finger against the good nostril and blow the affected one to dislodge the foreign object. Don’t ask a young child to do this—she might sniff the object back into her air passages.
  2. Alternatively, lay your child on her back and shine a light on her face. If you can see the object near the entrance to the nose, and if it is soft, remove it with tweezers. If it is farther up the nostril, leave it alone. If your child has breathing problems, treat this as an emergency. Dial for emergency help if necessary.

 

Should I seek medical help?

Seek medical advice as soon as possible or take your child to the nearest hospital emergency department if you cannot easily remove the object from her nose.

 

What might the doctor do?

Your doctor will remove the foreign object with a pair of forceps. If your child is very young, or refuses to stay still, she may have to be taken to hospital to have it removed under general anaesthesia.

 

What can I do to help?

Do not to allow a child under the age of three to play with toys or objects small enough to swallow or to put up her nose.

Similar Conditions Exist in Our Bodies

When a current of electricity passes through a fluid capable of decomposition the acids gather about the positive pole and the alkalies about the negative pole. We thus detect the exercise of separate activities on the part of the positive and negative electrical forces,—their polarization,—when we notice that alkalies and acids separate upon the application of electrical forces.

Similar conditions exist in our bodies. They occur in the mucous and serous membranes; for the serous secretions react acid, the mucous ones, alkaline. The contrast, in anatomical structure, between the mucous and the serous membranes is due to the fact that they line the various organs, respectively, within and without. It also indicates an opposition in their electro-magnetic forces.

These membranes cover, not only the large organs, but also the small ones, to the smallest muscular fibres. In this way an electro-magnetic contrast exists in every part of the body, and it is this opposition Of forces which keeps the vital machinery of the body in working order.

Electro-magnetic attraction and resistance are the agencies which control metabolism and the action of the organs, so long as bodily strength and healthy blood are maintained. All internal and external stimuli are nothing more than electro-magnetic processes.

Even our bodily temperature, as we commonly think of it under such conditions, resolves itself into electro-magnetic force or its product. Electricity, magnetism, light, and heat differ only in respect to vibration, and are in the final analysis one and the same.

But since our bodies are not cold like the earth or, like its electric forces, vibrate slowly, but are warm and of quick vibration, we are sufficiently assured that they contain, not only the cold electro-magnetic forces, of slow vibration, but also those that are warm and vibrate rapidly. And thus, when a correct relation exists between positive and negative forces—that is to say, between the forces of electricity and magnetism, then only have we normal temperature, then alone are we normally healthy.

When we come to enquire into the sources from which the body obtains these forces, there is little to be said. They are well known, can easily be traced, but to the keenest mind of scholarly research their source of origin is still an unturned page.

Of things in the human economy which count, however, first in importance are food and breath; for in every atom of food we eat and every breath of air we breathe there are electrons which enter the body, there to be seized by the attraction of electro-magnetic action, stored away, and applied in vital processes. A source of vital energy, commonly known and little recognized, is the free, pure air, or, ether charged with the electrons of space.

Out of space, positive and negative electrons constantly pass into the human body, their effect we feel at once; when, for instance, in a cold room, we commence to feel chilly, or on removal to a warm room, or into the sunlight, a comfortable feeling of warmth pervades the body and restores its normal temperature. Weather and local conditions have no small influence upon our state of health. In dry and elevated positions or in warm weather the condition of the body is more positive; in damp, low-lying places and in raw weather the electro-magnetic forces have a negative tendency.

This is the explanation of those disturbances of health which occasionally arise and which we sometimes experience in the dire form of epidemics. As an illustration, the difference of climatic conditions between the adjoining States of Washington and Oregon are a case in point.

Among other disturbing influences which effect the electro-magnetic forces of the body are overfeeding and underfeeding, too much and too little exercise,particularly too much or too little stimulation, or false stimulation, or excitement of a physical or mental nature. Any one of these influences may produce disorder in the relations of the electro-magnetic forces of the body. The positive or negative electrons may be abnormally increased or diminished or their location disturbed.

Differences of Vibration

It is only by differences of vibration in this world substance, which we may now venture to term electrons, that we are able to perceive a difference in objects around us.

It is a matter of primary interest that the organs of the body should differ in this way; for in them are electrons with their inherent electro-magnetic properties, upon which the whole bodily machinery depends. Within our bodies positive currents of energy flow from above downward; for manifestly the remainder of the body is governed by the head.

The electrons of the head must consequently be arranged as in a magnet—the positive pole above, the negative below—and they must be always connected with their opposite pole, because the strength and the nature of a magnet depend entirely upon such connection. Thus our heads, under normal conditions, are cool, and our feet warm, so long as positive electro-magnetic force flows from above downward.

In most men of the present day, on the contrary, a condition usually exists the exact opposite of that common to normal healthy individuals. A sense of well-being prevails in the body only so long as the electrons are in sympathetic contact with their opposite poles, and, because by this means they increase and extend their forces reciprocally, there exists also throughout the entire body a feeling of physical strength.

Life upon the earth is dependent, as we know, upon the power of the sun. Positive electrical forces are displayed in sunlight, and we find that the electrical forces of the soil furnish their complements. Electrical power is manifested by both the earth and the sun—a fact unquestioned by those acquainted with observations made in the field of radio-activity.

As a third factor, absolutely essential, I may mention the ocean, which I regard as the storage battery that distributes the power. Then mark the natural contrast between these mundane and solar forces—the one of a nature warm and vibrating quickly, the other cold and more slow of vibration.

From this we may infer that we have before us an electrical opposition, a polarity; and assuredly the electrical forces of the earth are those which are negative, since they vibrate more slowly and yield to control, while those of the sun are, on the contrary, positive, since they possess the higher capacity for vibration and dominate the electrical forces of the earth.

We may assert, further, that the forces of the earth are electrical, whilst those of the sun are magnetic. In support of this assertion the proof may be advanced that a magnet can raise a heavier load after lying in the sunlight; for the close affinity, between magnetism and sunlight are, in this way incontestably demonstrated.

The interchange of these principles underlies all mundane activity and existence, and upon its cessation life would wholly disappear from the planet. The various organs of the body, like everything else, fall under the immediate influence of this interchange of polar forces. The same electric or electro-magnetic opposition exists therein as are elsewhere apparent in nature and, for evidence of the same we have not far to seek. The phenomena occurring in electrolysis—the science of chemical decomposition by galvanic action—are well known.

When a current of electricity passes through a fluid capable of decomposition the acids gather about the positive pole and the alkalies about the negative pole. We thus detect the exercise of separate activities on the part of the positive and negative electrical forces,—their polarization,—when we notice that alkalies and acids separate upon the application of electrical forces.

Similar conditions exist in our bodies. They occur in the mucous and serous membranes; for the serous secretions react acid, the mucous ones, alkaline. The contrast, in anatomical structure, between the mucous and the serous membranes is due to the fact that they line the various organs, respectively, within and without. It also indicates an opposition in their electro-magnetic forces.

Discovery of the X-rays

This discovery of the X-rays was followed closely by that of the N-rays, by the two Curies, husband and wife. This further discovery was a still greater surprise to the scientific world than the former one; for by its aid was established nothing less than the inconstancy of matter. Hitherto science, dealing not with knowledge, but with opinions, had held the belief that the atom is the ultimate form of matter and that no chemical or physical force can divide it, a teaching held to be incontrovertible.

First, the discovery of the X-rays had markedly disturbed this belief, and then, on the discovery of the N-rays, it soon became indubitably clear that a constant destruction is taking place within the atom, an uninterrupted throwing off of smaller particles.

But it is not our task to show how one discovery after another was made. We are merely interested in knowing that, because of these discoveries, we find today in the atom—not in the radium atom alone, but in every atom as such—only a union of particles identical with one another, the so-called electrons, being but special forms of electro-magnetic forces.

Professor Gruner writes as follows: “The atom is no longer the accepted, final unit of matter, but has given place to the electron. The atom is no longer an individual compact particle of matter, but an aggregate of thousands of tiny bodies.

Furthermore, the atom is not indestructible; it can throw off successive electrons or groups of electrons from its numerous contents and so keep up a gradual, but veritable destruction.” Professor Thomson, who won the “Nobel” prize for his work on natural science, makes these distinct assertions:

“(1) The electron is nothing more than a form of electricity.

(2) Each electron weighs 1/770th of a fluid atom. Of an atom, that is, which, hitherto had been regarded as the smallest individual particle.

(3) A fluid atom consists of 770 electrons and is formed of electricity without any other material.

(4) The atoms of other elements, besides radium, are also composed of electrons and of nothing else. The number of electrons varies in different elements; for instance, an atom of quicksilver is composed of 150,000 electrons.

(5) Electricity is the basis of all being.” Hitherto we have been taught to consider our bodies and their organs from no other standpoint than that of their elements. For if we attribute all the life of the body to the cells, these must consist only of primary matter, like the atoms of which they are formed.

But we have now come to know that atoms, and, therefore, our bodies as well, are formed of electrons, or we might say, of crystalized electricity, consequently, we are compelled to recognize in the body a human machine operated entirely under the direction of electrical forces. For electrons cannot lose their electrical character, merely because they are grouped together in atoms and form our bodies.

It is a well known scientific fact that atoms attract and repel each other, just as is the case with electro-magnetic forces. Our bodies, then, are not only formed of electrons, which unite into atoms, but they are absolutely filled with free electrons; for every atom is surrounded with an envelope of free electrons, or, in other words, is the centre of a molecule of electrons, and carries its envelope of electrons precisely as the earth carries its envelope of air.

Thomson asserts on the basis of his latest observations that: “Every atom forms a planetary system. The 150,000 electrons of mercury, for instance, are arranged in four concentric spheres, like a system about the sun.”

When we arrive at a complete understanding of these facts and their bearing upon life, we shall be able to control our bodies with perfect success by regulating their electric forces and adjusting their energies.

As yet the main difficulty which obstructs our comprehension comes from the seeming dissimilarity of things within and things without man’s “passing strange, complex mortality.” This apparent lack of co-ordination presumedly stands in direct contradiction to the similarity of electrons.

But however similar electrons may be, they still have different vibrations, which cause the differences between various objects,—between colors, shapes and sounds, between positive and negative conditions.

The Race has Become Diseased

The race has become diseased, is suffering, cries out for a betterment of its conditions, grows constantly more embittered and renounces its faith in the powers, human and divine.

Epidemics of terrific proportions sweep their recurring millions into the arms of death; diseases of stupendous mortality, such as tuberculosis, cancer, syphilis, diabetes, and the extensive array of so-called contagious diseases of children, are continually increasing, in spite of doctors, hospitals, sanatoria, hydros, hygienics, asylums, nostrums and serums, and continue to afflict humanity, taking their ghastly toll in daily thousands, despite the vaunted but theoretical advancement of Medical Science.

In the field of medical science the controversy rages at full blast today. An endless succession of hypotheses, conjectures and dogmas lies widespread before us—a troubled sea of uncertainties—a complex labyrinth of doubt. The “doctors of medicine” are many but responsible physicians are few, while disease is constantly on the increase among mankind.

It is really little that the people have to learn, for instinct has taught them there is little to be hoped of succour from the professional source. But the world-old habit of superstitious fear and reverence for the “Medicine Man” fetish yet holds its grip upon the race—alike in the savage or the Senate and, despite the knowledge of its fallacy, humanity, still faithful, turns to it weakly, fear-driven, in its hour of distress, knowing no self-reliance and no safer refuge.

The reader will pardon this digression, since it is better that from the outset we should divest ourselves of all delusions and recognize existing conditions as they really are in order that it may help to eliminate these ignorant superstitions from the public mind and implant therein the wholesome fact that there is no magic in medicine but simply an ordinary problem of cause and effect.

Existence is movement; the whole visible world is progress, development. These are facts which, in truth, are daily becoming more generally known. But man— even modern man—is still so stubbornly unyielding in his faith that what he learns in an instant becomes immovably rooted in his mind to the utter exclusion, generally, of anything new, which even though it be a matter of demonstrated fact, it matters not if at variance with this earlier knowledge; to him it is an impossibility.

How often the fallacy of such ultra-conservative principles has been demonstrated has no bearing upon the case; the fact remains—irrational, stupid though it be— that, sublimely indifferent to criticism, it survives, with all the wrong and persecution that follows in its train.

But one of the most noticeable surprises of this description occurred in the year 1896, when Professor Roentgen made public his discovery of the X-rays; for through this discovery facts were disclosed such for instance, as the permeability of solid bodies by luminous rays and the possibility of photographic examination of bony tissues in living creatures—facts entirely incompatible with prevailing ideas and teachings.

But these facts were not only intrinsically veracious but were capable of occular demonstration, beyond all possibility of doubt, and thus, as nothing could be changed or refuted, science found itself compelled, for once, to honour the truth in its initial stage—to receive them gracefully unto itself and adopt them in its teachings.